About Us


With a notably long view down Berry Lane at the front, and commanding views over the Ribble Valley and surrounding Pennine Hills at the rear, it is easy to imagine that there has been a pub located on the site of The Dog Inn since the 1830’s.

Having previously morphed from a popular local pub into an Indian restaurant, it had fallen upon hard times and eventually closed down. Though as an integral part of the town, local residents battled hard for its survival.

Today, it has been brought back to life by the owner, Ben Lee, and his mother, Catherine Ball, who’s mission has been to turn the once vibrant pub back into the thriving local watering hole that it once was – rescuing ancient walls and old stonework which was both a challenge and a pleasure.


This historic inn is now decorated in a rustic style with a quirky fusion. A great place to bunker down in winter, it’s full of cosy, intimate spaces and has three log fires to thaw out beside while you tuck into one of its hearty Sunday roasts. Not forgetting the ‘Dog House’, a small tap room which provides an alternative atmosphere, where friends are invited to meet for a pint, watch sport and play darts.


Add to that a sun-trap terrace for warmer days, where you can dine al fresco – and you’ve got a place that’s well worth a visit all year round.

 

About Us


With a notably long view down Berry Lane at the front, and commanding views over the Ribble Valley and surrounding Pennine Hills at the rear, it is easy to imagine that there has been a pub located on the site of The Dog Inn since the 1830’s.

Having previously morphed from a popular local pub into an Indian restaurant, it had fallen upon hard times and eventually closed down. Though as an integral part of the town, local residents battled hard for its survival.

Today, it has been brought back to life by the owner, Ben Lee, and his mother, Catherine Ball, who’s mission has been to turn the once vibrant pub back into the thriving local watering hole that it once was – rescuing ancient walls and old stonework which was both a challenge and a pleasure.


This historic inn is now decorated in a rustic style with a quirky fusion. A great place to bunker down in winter, it’s full of cosy, intimate spaces and has three log fires to thaw out beside while you tuck into one of its hearty Sunday roasts. Not forgetting the ‘Dog House’, a small tap room which provides an alternative atmosphere, where friends are invited to meet for a pint, watch sport and play darts.


Add to that a sun-trap terrace for warmer days, where you can dine al fresco – and you’ve got a place that’s well worth a visit all year round.